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Sacro Pagan, 1978

The world of the ceremonial has interested Miralda since the late sixties. Besides orchestrating all kinds of ceremonies that have combined physical and mental geographies, he has also documented the meeting places of different cultures through collective rituals such as processions, parades and demonstrations. New York has been one of his fields of activity. His sacred pagan notes document, through sketches and pictures, the contrast in the city of New York between the religious celebrations of Easter Week in the Bronx Puerto Rican neighbourhood and a parade on Broadway commemorating the release of American hostages in the Middle East.
While, on the one hand, the Easter processions in the Bronx reveal the mixture of races in the Hispanic community of this neighbourhood, the parade on Broadway highlights the purely American identity in the face of the kidnapping of American citizens in Iran. Beyond folklorism or easy ethnography, Miralda is interested in the location of the ordinary, in that exchange of symbolic spaces that occurs between mixed races and the various ways of understanding the world that coexist in the same physical and urban geography.

Technical details

Original title:
Sacro Pagan
Registration number:
2892
Artist:
Miralda
Date created:
1978
Date acquired:
1999
Fonds:
MACBA Collection. MACBA Foundation
Object type:
Media
Media:
8 mm film transferred into video, colour, silent, 17 min 50 s
Credits:
MACBA Collection. MACBA Foundation
Copyright:
© Antoni Miralda, VEGAP, Barcelona
It has accessibility resources:
No

The MACBA Collection features Catalan, Spanish and international art and, although it includes works from the 1920s onwards, its primary focus is on the period between the 1960s and the present.

For more information on the work or the artist, please consult MACBA's Library. To request a loan of the work, please write to colleccio [at] macba.cat.

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Blue protects white from innocence. Blue drags black with it. Blue is darkness made visible.
Derek Jarman