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The people who charge for their sexual services have been called many things, from the most stigmatising, like ‘hookers', to the ones that provide a better self-image, such as ‘sex workers', by way of the more or less neutral term ‘prostitutes'. Society labels, marginalises and points the finger at the stigmatised sectors as possible receivers of aggressive behaviour. And so the image given (in the media and speeches) of a particular group is not only a reflection of the position they occupy in society but an element from which that position is laid out.
Thinking about the social image of sex workers enables us to work on the stereotypes and see where society places its limits of flexibility at any time.

Taking part in the debate are the associations working in the field and the sex workers themselves.

Organised in association with LICIT (Line for Investigation and Cooperation with Immigrants and Sex Workers).


Programme

FRIDAY 12, EVENING
The stigma of prostitution.
Public lecture by Dolores Juliano, anthropologist and vice-president of LICIT.
Auditorium. Limited number of seats.

SATURDAY 13, ALL DAY LONG
Auditorium. Limited number of seats.

Blue protects white from innocence. Blue drags black with it. Blue is darkness made visible.
Derek Jarman