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The exhibition Multiple Identity brought together a substantial selection of works from the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, which houses the world’s largest collection of twentieth century North American art. Visitors were able to see some seventy works from over fifty artists that offered an excellent overview of the art produced in the United States in the twenty years between 1975 and 1997, a period of intense creative activity in which artistic practices became increasingly interested in social, linguistic and media-related issues.

At MACBA, large works by Sol Lewitt and Dennis Oppenheim were displayed alongside a spectacular installation by Jonathan Borofsky, one of Jeff Koons’ ironic sculptures, and critical-social works by Barbara Kruger. The commitment to the organic and the feminine in the works by Lynda Benglis and Ana Mendieta was complemented by Leon Golub’s anti-militarist paintings and minimalist works by Carl Andre. The eighties and nineties were represented by the works of artists such as Sherrie Levine and Martha Rosler, who probe the relationship between language and image, David Hammons and Jean-Michel Basquiat, who explore cultural identity, and Mike Kelley and Sue Williams, who plunge into the memory of childhood conflicts.

Blue protects white from innocence. Blue drags black with it. Blue is darkness made visible.
Derek Jarman