to

Robert Filliou (Sauve, France, 1926 – Les Eyzies, France, 1987) said that “art is what makes life more interesting than art.” This artist who was part of the Fluxus movement, whose work is close to concrete poetry and who was heir to the spirit of Surrealism, began his artistic career around 1960 when he met Daniel Spoerri and became familiar with the more progressive art scenes in Paris. He immediately put into practice his notion of “constant creation”, a concept based on participatory and emancipatory art that can arise anywhere and at any time. His nomadic, portable and precarious works exude an incisive and also subtle humour. To give one example, his Galerie Légitime (1962): a hat full of small objects that the artist would spontaneously turn into an itinerant art gallery by setting it up on the street. Filliou believed that all of us carry genius within us, but it is hidden from us by the constant exercise of our talents.

Robert Filliou. Genius without Talent was the first retrospective exhibition on this artist in Spain, and the most extensive that had been organised anywhere in the world at the time. The exhibition presented some 180 works, including written and visual poems, objects, sculptures, videos, installations and documentation of his performances.

The exhibition Robert Filliou. Genius without Talent covers thirty years of creative work by the French artist Robert Filliou (Sauve, 1926 – Les Eyzies, 1987) and comprises more than 180 works.

Guest Curator: Sylvie Jouval
Coproduction: Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Museum Kunst Palast Düsseldorf -
Musée d'Art Moderne Lille Metropole.

Itinerances

26 JUY. - 09 NOV. 2003 Museum Kunst Palast Düsseldorf
11 APR. - 29 JUNE 2003 Museum galleries
06 DEC. 2003 - 28 MAR. 2004 LAM Lille Métropole Musée d'Art Moderne, d'art contemporain et d'Art brut, France

The objects are intended to have the objective character of industrial products. They are not intended to represent anything other than what they are. The previous categorization of the arts no longer exists.
Charlotte Posenenske