Saturdays 8, 15 and 16 February

at 7.30 pm

Museum galleries

Free admission

The programme for the last Saturday of every month during the first quarter of the year is dedicated to dance. Art history and museums do not consist only of objects: indeed, dance and choreography have been an inseparable part of the most radical experiments in art. In the case of Minimalism, the importance of the relationship between the object, space and body led to it being considered a new theatrical genre, while artists like Charlotte Posenenske introduced choreographic elements into their work.

This is why Dance at the end of the month will open on the last Saturday of January with Carmelo Salazar performing in the galleries of the exhibition Charlotte Posenenske:Work in Progress. The choreographer and dancer from the Canary Islands has made an in-depth exploration of the limits of dance from various physical experiments in which the limits of the stage are extended. On this occasion, Salazar will enter into dialogue with Posenenske’s work, its variability and the social critique it presents.

In February, Senior Curator at Tate Modern Catherine Wood will open the session with a lecture on Posenenske’s work and its transitional character, comparing it with conductors and nodes that act as transition points from one state to another. The lecture will be followed by Invisible labor (Invisible Labour)by Paz Rojo, who for more than a decade has been questioning the power of the body, dance beyond the market, anonymity and the possibilities of cultural production outside the framework of the production of value.

To close the quarter, the Museum will participate in the Quinzena Metropolitana de la Dansa (Metropolitan Dance Fortnight) with Soliloquios (Soliloquy), a piece by Jon Maya, Cesc Gelabert and Andrés Marín.

Free MACBA Saturday thanks to Uniqlo:

Logo dissabtes MACBA
Logo UNIQLO
Kugach's before the dance © Andy Freeberg

Programme

Activity
Carmelo Salazar "Non Show Work in Minimal Ground"

Carmelo Salazar, Non Show Work in Minimal Ground

7:30 pm

Museum galleries

Free admission

'This past autumn, I received an invitation from MACBA and the SÂLMON< Festival to stage my choreographic work within the context of the exhibition of Minimalist artist Charlotte Posenenske. After much consideration, I decided that what I was going to present were two of my previous choreographies: specifically, one of my first group works, El salón dorado ( 2003), and my last creation, Fin del mundo beauty (2019). Somehow, I felt obliged to choose these two pieces because, although they were not conceived from any conscious minimalist umbrella, they both start from a formal and conceptual subversion, they are entirely minimalist and, most importantly, they share most of the ethical and aesthetic reflections embraced by Posenenske in her work.'

Activity
Exhibition views of 'Charlotte Posenenske: Work in Progress'. Photo: Miquel Coll

Catherine Wood, Charlotte Posenenske: Sculpture in the Social Network

7:30 pm

Museum galleries

Free admission

'In my lecture, I will discussthe way in which Charlotte Posenenske deliberately sited, staged and performed her D-form sculptures within both human and infrastructural networks. Her unique conception of the choreography of her minimally formed sculptures has elements in common with American Minimalism, but she was more explicit in her understanding of how the sculptures might intersect with the reality of their site, and how art might intervene in social reality and operate within an industrial context.'

Activity
Kugach's before the dance © Andy Freeberg

Paz Rojo, Invisible Labor (Invisible Labour)

8:30 pm

Museum galleries

Free admission

The noun labour can refer to ‘the working class’ (1839). It also refers to the ‘physical efforts of being in labour’, as witnessed since the 1590s in the abbreviation ‘labour’, meaning ‘to give birth’. The verb ‘to work’ is also linked to putting things in order; to sorting out the future with a predetermined end in mind. On the other hand, the adjective ‘invisible’ refers to that which is impossible to see: what cannot be perceived with our eyes or what cannot be perceived because it has been made invisible by those devices that legitimise the visible versus the invisible. ‘Invisible’ is also used as a synonym for ‘immaterial’. Among other things, the term ‘immaterial work’ describes the alienating conditions and the labour associated with care and domestic work, which maintain an affective and materialised component. ‘Invisible’ is also synonymous with hidden, latent, concealed. Sometimes invisible work includes resistance to inactivity and the passage of time, looking silence and boredom in the face.

Activity
kukai dantza

Soliloquios (Soliloquies)

7:30 pm

Museum galleries

Free admission

Three dancers are located in three of the museum galleries while the public is free to circulate among them. Three personal trajectories and three views on art converge in the same space and time, punctuated by the sound installation of Luis Miguel Cobo, which proposes a constant and simultaneous acoustic contamination.

Original Idea: Jon Maya
Choreographic conception: Cesc Gelabert
Dancers: Cesc Gelabert, Jon Maya, Andrés Marín
Musical creation: Luis Miguel Cobo
Lighting design: David Bernués
Production: Kukai Dantza (Jon Maya, Doltza Oararteta, Nagore Martínez)

This activity is part of the Quinzena Metropolitana de la Dansa.

macba [at] macba [dot] cat
Tel. 93 481 33 68


Exhibition

I don’t think about art when I’m working. I try to think about life
Jean-Michel Basquiat