Exhibition

The skin of the world+some other things

Dieter Roth

Dieter Roth

Dieter Roth "Literaturwürste", 1961

  • Fecha:
    12 Apr. - 02 July 2001
    Lugar:
    Sales del museu

The work of Dieter Roth (Hanover, 1930 - Basel, 1998) resists classification. Roth was trained as a graphic designer, but soon began to show an interest in art and concrete poetry. He made some forays into Op Art and Kinetic Art, and associated with the Fluxus group and the new realists, but if there is one thing that characterised his work it is the inseparable relationship that it sets up between art and life. Roth drew on a wide range of media: painting, sculpture, photography, drawing, graphic works, video, film, music and poetry. And he tended to use a heterogeneous collection of non-artistic and perishable materials which drove museum curators crazy: chocolate, cheese, sugar, remains of excrements, humus and other scraps.

The core of the MACBA exhibition on his work, Die Haut der Welt (The Skin of the World), was based on a selection from the Archiv Sohm collection housed at the Saatsgalerie in Stuttgart, which consists of small-format works produced from the sixties to the eighties, including objects, drawings, paintings, and his famous “Literature Sausages”. There was also a special focus on Roth’s large-scale installations and a section focusing on his links to Catalonia, particularly Cadaqués – where he used to meet, work and exhibit with Richard Hamilton – and Barcelona, where he created the work Tibidabo-24 Hours of Dogs’ Barking (1977). The exhibition also included a substantial selection of artist’s books.

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