Jo Spence was central to the debates around photography, feminism and the critique of representation in the seventies and eighties. Her work became autobiographical, using photography as a tool for rebellion and therapy. Through the reconstruction of the traumatic events often omitted from family photo albums –deaths, divorces, conflicts, abuse and illness–, the artist proposed a new approach to her own image and the roles we adopt in society. Spence believed that the private uses of photography in family albums are ‘visual constructions’ that do not represent the ‘self’, having political implications that affect our way of thinking and behaving.

WORKS IN THE COLLECTION BY JO SPENCE

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While there are ideas about psychological and emotional developmental processes held within the sculptures I make, the things themselves are actual physical explorations into thinking, feeling, communicating and relating.
Karla Black