In the eighties, the Guerrilla Girls decided to incorporate new strategies to the feminism of the seventies, such as humour and stridence, wit and laughter. Although still influenced by the pioneering work of artists such as Judy Chicago and art critic Lucy Lippard denouncing the invisibility of women in the art world, the fresh language used by the Guerrilla Girls to address the public at large can be seen as a turning point. The text looms large, but is used in the form of a question or metaphor, in the first person, or combined with succinct but forceful statistical data. Adopting the strategies of so-called ‘guerrilla’ communication, they use elements designed to reach a wide public and ensure that their messages are heard.

WORKS IN THE COLLECTION BY ISIDORO VALCÁRCEL MEDINA

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The problem becomes clear, crystal clear: the artist’s canvas becomes a mirror.
Michelangelo Pistoletto