Post-rock?
Activity

Post-rock?

in progress
David Grubbs

Grec 2009 Concert Series

In his March 1994 review of the album Hex for Mojo magazine, British music critic Simon Reynolds used the term post-rock to describe the music of the group Bark Psychosis. Although it was not the first time the label was used, Reynolds’s text is usually cited as the foundation milestone par excellence of this non-genre.

According to Reynolds, post-rock embraces a new way of conceiving rock in which the exploration of timbre prevails over harmonic progression, and instrumental and abstract elements prevail over literal and narrative ones; a kind of rock that doesn’t want to stop at just being rock, and integrates the advances in rhythm and texture that emerged from electronica, jazz, hip-hop and Jamaican dub; a kind of rock that, without rejecting the past (its wide stylistic range allows frequent glimpses of the legacy of German Krautrock or the Rock In Opposition of Henry Cow and Art Bears), resists reiterating it.

But post-rock cannot be identified and classified exclusively by its stylistic constants: it has many discourses, and all kinds of audiences. This may explain why the term is often thrown around without much thought, and why it is often conceptualised simply according to the subjectivity of the person using it. There are those who want to see it as the recuperation of the essences of seventies German rock, a return to progressive rock, while others celebrate the (apparent) surrender of guitars to the (apparently) infinite possibilities of the electronic medium. Some even connect it to the post-punk of the early eighties through the influence of Jamaican music. In reality all of them —and none of them— are right. In its essence, post-rock is actually defined by what it is not: traditional, pre-codified, easy to consume.

More futurist than postmodern, but not very belligerent and thus without the media impact required for commercial success, post-rock developed on the margins of the market and uses the same circuits as many of the other stylistic fragmentations of the «alternative» scene. All in all, if something can be called ‘post-rock’, it is an attitude: in favour of singularity and curiosity, of the freedom to choose aesthetically and of experimentation outside of dogmas and canons.

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dates
2 July 2009 – 23 July 2009
price
Admission: 5 eur. Friends of MACBA: free. MACBA Auditorium. Limited seating
title
Post-rock?
dates
2 July 2009 – 23 July 2009
title
Post-rock?
price
Admission: 5 eur. Friends of MACBA: free. MACBA Auditorium. Limited seating
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