Open Library. Introduction to contemporary thought. First Part
Activity

Open Library. Introduction to contemporary thought. First Part

By Paul B. Preciado


‘I don’t write for an audience. I write for users, not readers.’ With this phrase Foucault defined his relationship with books, understood as ‘toolboxes’ that were made to be used, not learned and repeated. Following this premise, this course, designed for a general audience, aims to give access to the various philosophical, conceptual and political instruments and languages necessary for understanding current debates.

In each session, a contemporary thinker introduces us to a work from within, not as a specialist, but as critical ‘user’. Through their uses, different thinkers guide us in the reinterpretation of concepts whose critical decoding is essential for understanding contemporaneity: historical materialism, collage, desiring machines, biopolitics, the coloniality of power, writing, the unconscious, touch, perception, performativity, community and the commons. Participants come to this course to recycle their grammars and change their libraries: in short, to learn to use texts and mobilise ideas.


‘I don’t write for an audience. I write for users, not readers.’ With this phrase Foucault defined his relationship with books, understood as ‘toolboxes’ that were made to be used, not learned and repeated. Following this premise, this course, designed for a general audience, aims to give access to the various philosophical, conceptual and political instruments and languages necessary for understanding current debates.

In each session, a contemporary thinker introduces us to a work from within, not as a specialist, but as critical ‘user’. Through their uses, different thinkers guide us in the reinterpretation of concepts whose critical decoding is essential for understanding contemporaneity: historical materialism, collage, desiring machines, biopolitics, the coloniality of power, writing, the unconscious, touch, perception, performativity, community and the commons. Participants come to this course to recycle their grammars and change their libraries: in short, to learn to use texts and mobilise ideas.

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