It’s the bomb! The Cold War in Animated Film
Activity

It’s the bomb! The Cold War in Animated Film

in progress

Children's film series

Almost all of the movies included in the fourth cycle of Little Histories of Cinema were created during the Cold War as didactic tools for young children that taught them about the situation in their own country, be it the United States or Russia. This period, which ended in 1989 with the fall of the Berlin Wall, was characterized by the arms race between the respective governments to feed worries of imminent attack from the other side, which allowed both fear and false confidences to develop. The fear was of the effects of the Atom bomb, which were assuaged by the faulty belief that the government could protect its own from harm.

This series shows how authorities informed and misinformed its citizens, and how the movie industry and its artists interpreted that in the name of conscientiousness and entertainment. Distance gained through time passed has turned these films into very useful historical documents, not only for the information that they give us about certain aspects of daily life in each society, such as their fears and trends, but also because they show the mechanisms of mass propaganda developed after WWII, which actually created these trends and fears that are evident even today. The chosen films are appropriate for young children, though older members of the audience will benefit from a more critical and complete reading of the material that, today, mostly sits in archives collecting dust.

The concept of Little Histories of Cinema arose from the idea of fusing two "histories." In the 1930s Walter Benjamin wrote A Little History of Photography; a brief, written illumination of an era in which a true story of the new cinematic medium had yet to consolidate itself, but that greatly influenced the 20th century. More than half a century later, in the 1990s, Jean-Luc Godard proposed his Histoire(s) du cinema, a truly "other history of cinema" that was, at the same time, a way to construct histories. The history of the technological arts of the 20th century is one of positions; of winners and losers; of those that are remembered and those forgotten; of big and small. The true history is essentially a story and is, therefore, never true.

These cinematic histories are little in two ways. In the first place, they propose hypotheses about other possible histories that have remained marginalized within the larger story of 20th century film. Secondly, they are meant for children; the little ones; in order to seriously and respectfully explain that film has been the most important art of the 20th century.

Curated by Carolina Caballero

see more show less

Children’s film series

Almost all of the movies included in the fourth cycle of Little Histories of Cinema were created during the Cold War as didactic tools for young children that taught them about the situation in their own country, be it the United States or Russia. This period, which ended in 1989 with the fall of the Berlin Wall, was characterized by the arms race between the respective governments to feed worries of imminent attack from the other side, which allowed both fear and false confidences to develop. The fear was of the effects of the Atom bomb, which were assuaged by the faulty belief that the government could protect its own from harm.

This series shows how authorities informed and misinformed its citizens, and how the movie industry and its artists interpreted that in the name of conscientiousness and entertainment. Distance gained through time passed has turned these films into very useful historical documents, not only for the information that they give us about certain aspects of daily life in each society, such as their fears and trends, but also because they show the mechanisms of mass propaganda developed after WWII, which actually created these trends and fears that are evident even today. The chosen films are appropriate for young children, though older members of the audience will benefit from a more critical and complete reading of the material that, today, mostly sits in archives collecting dust.

The concept of Little Histories of Cinema arose from the idea of fusing two “histories.” In the 1930s Walter Benjamin wrote A Little History of Photography; a brief, written illumination of an era in which a true story of the new cinematic medium had yet to consolidate itself, but that greatly influenced the 20th century. More than half a century later, in the 1990s, Jean-Luc Godard proposed his Histoire(s) du cinema, a truly “other history of cinema” that was, at the same time, a way to construct histories. The history of the technological arts of the 20th century is one of positions; of winners and losers; of those that are remembered and those forgotten; of big and small. The true history is essentially a story and is, therefore, never true.

These cinematic histories are little in two ways. In the first place, they propose hypotheses about other possible histories that have remained marginalized within the larger story of 20th century film. Secondly, they are meant for children; the little ones; in order to seriously and respectfully explain that film has been the most important art of the 20th century.

Curated by Carolina Caballero

see more show less
dates
6 October 2007 – 1 December 2007
price
MACBA Auditorium. Free admission. Limited seating.
title
It’s the bomb! The Cold War in Animated Film
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