From this perspective, its mission focuses on researching and disseminating today’s art among broader audiences so as to trigger social transformations by empowering visitors and users to engage in intense democratic, cultural and educational behaviours.

We view the museum as a host venue operating through a principle of hospitality yet aware of the underlying conditions as the subject of a context affected by the social tensions deriving from globalisation. By considering our social fabric as a breakthrough, critical and poetic agent, we promote artistic practices that invite us to reflect, that reject the obvious and that are capable of creating new, shared spaces serving as a laboratory for renewed citizenship. We aim to go beyond what is known, or accepted, as real and possible in order to venture into the realm of the probable.

Through its activities, the MACBA researches, investigates and creates tangible and intangible heritage. This vision provides it with its own genuine character which is rounded out by a constant transfer of knowledge to society. All of this is combined with a clear and decisive desire to become a local, national and international flagship on the cutting edge of discourse and artistic research into the present through art.

The MACBA intrinsically incorporates the capacity to connect diverse artistic expressions from architecture to poetry along with design, performance, the arts, film and music in addition to connecting artists to audiences. The MACBA aspires to be a museum that generates and promotes all types of connections through its capacity to weave cooperative ties and complicities with various stakeholders in society, particularly through its educational dimension. Thus, education is a platform where aesthetic action can shape experience, create new forms of political subjectivity and make each individual an agent capable of building meaning. The idea is to view education not as an instrumental tool but rather as a means for emancipation, seeking out new ways to generate knowledge. The MACBA, therefore, has the capacity to activate long-term educational research projects so that it can lead the conversation on artistic education at the national and international levels and generate contacts with institutions everywhere.

I like to work with what is often called "cultural heritage", but the materials that I use are banal and clichéd, like sugar blocks, doors, couscous, rugs, official documents.
Latifa Echakhch